5k Friday: Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 8

Run a 5k 8Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 8

By the end of week seven, you were running 20 minutes without stopping. Just think about that for a moment. You’re a runner! This week we will build on that, by increasing the time/distance. Remember to take a body check from time to time. Shin pain in particular, can plague new runners. We’ve taken it pretty slow in order to avoid injuries, but be sure to use ice as prescribed and if something hurts a little, take an extra day or two off. (Did you miss week one? Click here.)

This week you will start where you left off, with a 20 minute run. By the end of the week you will add several minutes onto that. Like the other weeks you will have three key workouts with two other easy days (one of which is optional). Don’t forget your stretching!

Remember, all workouts start with an 8-10 minute brisk warm-up walk. On your rest days, feel free to do some strength training, yoga, Pilates, etc.

Day One: After your warm up, run for 20 minutes. Cool down, stretch ice.

Day Two: Active recovery. After your warm up, run for 8 minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Repeat. Cool Down and stretch.

Day Three: Warm up, Run for 10 minutes. Walk for one minute. Run for 10 minutes. Walk for run minute. Run for three minutes, then cool down.

Day Four: Rest.

Day Five: Warm up, the run for 23 minutes. Cool down, stretch, etc.

Day Six: (Optional) Active Recovery. Warm up, run for 15 minutes. Walk for one minute, then run for two more minutes.

Day Seven: Rest.

Coming next week: We will continue to add time/distance to your run, plus add an optional speed workout if you would like to get a little bit faster for your race.

Getting Faster

Getting_Faster.JPGRefer back to this post for information on whether you’re ready to add speed to your workout, how to find your goal pace, reasons for each workout as well as the first week of workouts to add to your training.

The Workouts:

The Long Run: At this point in your training, your long run should be at least six miles. You can keep it at that or add another half mile. To add a little mileage to your week, add a half mile to one of your other runs (not the speed workouts).

The Interval Workout: On the track for 800 meter repeats. After your 10 minute warm up, run 800 meters at slightly faster than your 5k pace (about 90-95% of VO2Max). Recover by jogging or walking 200 meters. Repeat five more times. Cool down by walking or jogging 400-800 meters. Stretch (and don’t forget to ice after your workout!)

The Lactate Threshold Workout: On the road for this workout. After your one mile easy warm up, run 10 minutes at slightly less that your 5k pace (about 85-90% of your maximal effort). Recover by jogging for two minutes. Repeat two more times. Cool down by jogging a half mile, and finish with a stretch.

Remember, in addition to these workouts, you can run another one-three days during the week, nice easy, shorter runs (recovery runs). A sample schedule can be found in this post.

Nice job on week eight. See you next week!

5k Friday: Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 7

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Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 7

While last week (week 6) was a bit of a break, that only served to make you stronger by giving your body a well deserved rest. At the end of week five, you were running 20 minutes with only one break. Fantastic! We’ll be building on that this week. (Did you miss week one? Click here.)

By the end of this week, you will be able to run your entire 20 minute workout without a break. Again, you will have three key workouts, with two other easy days (one of which is optional). Remember to listen to your body, take an extra day off if necessary, don’t skip your stretching, and finally, enjoy yourself. You’re a runner now.

Remember, all workouts begin with an 8-10 minute brisk walk, and finish with about a five minute walk, stretching, and icing. On your rest days, feel free to do some strength training, yoga, Pilates, etc.

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Day One: Repeat last week’s day six workout: Warm up. Run for 10 minutes. Walk for one minute. Repeat. Cool Down.

Day Two: Active Recovery Day. After your warm up, run for five minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Repeat two more times.

Day Three: After your warm up, run for 15 minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for five minutes. Cool Down.

Day Four: Rest

Day Five: Here it is! Warm up. Run for 20 minutes. Cool Down.

Day Six: (Optional) Active Recovery: Warm up, run for six minutes. Walk for 20 seconds. Repeat two more times.

Day Seven: Rest

Coming next week: Now that you can run for 20 minutes straight, we will start adding on more time/distance.

Getting Faster

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Refer back to this post for information on whether you’re ready to add speed to your workout, how to find your goal pace, reasons for each workout as well as the first week of workouts to add to your training.

The Workouts

The Long Run: After several weeks of increasing your mileage, with one cutback week, you are probably running a sufficient distance in preparation for a 5k. If you want to continue to increase your mileage, go ahead and add on a half mile to this run. If you are running six miles or more for your long run, you really don’t need to add on more at this level of training. If you choose not to increase your long run, add a half mile to one of your other runs during the week (not the speed workouts). Don’t forget to stretch.

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The Interval Workout: Back to basic speed work, on the track, 400 meter intervals. After your 10 minute warm up, run 400 meters at slightly faster than your your 5k pace (about 95% of VO2Max). Recover by jogging or walking 200 meters. Repeat 11 more times. Cool down by walking or jogging 400-800 meters. Stretch (and don’t forget to ice after your workout!)

The Lactate Threshold Workout: On the road for this basic tempo run. After your one mile easy warm up, run two miles at slightly less that your 5k pace (about 85-90% of your maximal effort). Cool down by jogging a half mile, and finish with a stretch.

Remember, in addition to these workouts, you can run another one-three days during the week, nice easy, shorter runs (recovery runs). A sample schedule can be found in this post.

Week seven is in the bag. See you next week!

5k Friday: Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 4

Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 4

By the end of last week, you had accomplished several things. (Did you miss week one? Click here.) You were able to run five minutes at one time. You were also running about 18 minutes during a single workout, with very little walking. Is everything feeling good? Any aches and pains? Take a body check from time to time. Even though we’re taking things slow, you are still adding a great deal of exercise into your life. Be smart, if you’re feeling sore or tired, it is okay to take an extra rest day now and then. Your body talks to you. You just have to listen.

This week, we will be adding an optional extra running day into the mix. It will be shorter and easier that the others, but still it will be an extra day. Because of that addition, we’re not going to make a huge change in the length of your running intervals, but we will cut down a little on your rest intervals. If you have any shin or knee pain, do not add this extra day (and you should probably take an extra day off). Remember, each workout starts with an 8-10 minute brisk walk and ends with a 5 minute slower walk, stretching and icing.

Day One: Repeat last week’s day six workout: After your warm up, run for four minutes. Walk for one minute. Run for five minutes. Walk for one minute. Repeat both intervals.

Day Two: The point of this workout is to decrease your walking rest periods while maintaining your running intervals. Warm up, then run for four minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Repeat two more times. This is a little less total running than we’ve been doing, but because we’re adding on another running day tomorrow, we don’t want to overdo it.

Day Three: (Optional) You may be feeling tired this morning, but unless you are hurting, try to push through it. It will be a pretty easy workout. After your warm up, run for three minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for four minutes. Walk for one minute. Run for five minutes. Cool down.

Day Four: Rest Day. Strength, Yoga, Pilates, etc. are okay.

Day Five: This is your key workout of the week. Hopefully you are feeling strong after your rest day. Warm up. Run five minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Repeat three more times. Cool down.

Day Six: Repeat day five, with only three intervals.

Day Seven: Rest Day. You can take it completely off if you’d like, or do some weights, etc.

Congratulations! You’ve been running for a month! Great job! Next week we will lengthen the intervals, and one of the workouts will be all running (except the warm up/cool down).

Running Faster

 

Refer back to this post for information on whether you’re ready to add speed to your workout, how to find your goal pace, reasons for each workout as well as the first week of workouts to add to your training.

The Workouts

The Long Run: This week add one half mile to your run on one day of the week.

The Interval Workout: We’re still on the track for this workout. Warm up for about a mile. This is a ladder workout. Each interval will be a little longer than the previous. You will be running each interval at about the same pace, about 90-95% of your max effort, though, so be careful not to go all out on some of the shorter intervals then not be able to keep the pace on the longer ones.

Interval 1: 200 meters (halfway around the track)
Interval 2: 400 meters
Interval 3: 600 meters
Interval 4: 800 meters
Interval 5: 1000 meters
Interval 6: 800 meters
Interval 7: 600 meters
Interval 8: 400 meters
Interval 9: 200 meters

Finish with a cool down and a good stretch.

The Lactate Threshold Workout: We are back on the road for this workout. After your warm up, increase your pace to about 85-90% of your maximum effort. Maintain this pace for one mile. Drop the speed and jog for about 3-5 minutes. Repeat one to three more times, depending on you current mileage (don’t exceed the distance of your long run). Finish with your cool down and stretch.

Remember, in addition to these workout, you can run another one-three days during the week, nice easy, shorter runs (recovery runs). A sample schedule can be found in this post.

Week four is in the bag! Great job!

5k Friday: Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 3

Run a 5k

Your 12 Week 5k Training Program, Week 3

By the end of last week, you were running up to running two minute intervals, with walk breaks of only 30 seconds. Hurray for you! (Just getting started? Here’s week one.) Hopefully, you’ve been following the plan, resting when prescribed, icing, stretching, etc. Our goal for this week is to bring the running up to five minutes straight! Let’s get started.

Remember, you always want to start your workout with a warm up, and for now, it will be walking briskly for 8-10 minutes. And always take about five minutes at the end of the workout to cool down, nice easy walking is best.

Day One: You’re going to start with last week’s Day Five workout. After your warm-up, run for two minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Repeat five more times. Finish with your cool down. Do not skip the stretching and icing.

Day Two: Kind of a mixed bag workout. After your warm up, run for two minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Now, run for three minutes. Walk for one minute. Run for two minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for three minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for two minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for three and a half minutes. Cool down. (If you feel like you need a little longer break after the longer intervals, please go ahead, but don’t walk for too long.)

Day Three: Still your rest day. Yoga, weights, etc. are okay.

Day Four: After your warm up, run for three minutes. Walk for one minute, then run for four minutes. Walk for 30 seconds, then run for three minutes. Walk for 30 seconds. Run for four minutes. One minute walk, then a final three minute run. Cool down, stretch, ice.

Day Five: Complete rest today, we’ve got a big one tomorrow.

Day Six: After your warm up, run for four minutes. Walk for one minute. Run for five minutes. Walk for one minute. Repeat both intervals. Cool down, stretch ice.

Day Seven: Rest. You had a tough week, but look what you’ve accomplished! A total of 18 minutes of running with very little walking time. You can do some strength training, etc. but complete rest is okay, too.

Week three is complete! Congratulations. Next week, we’ll add another running day and increase those running intervals a little more.

Running Faster

CIFRefer back to this post for information on whether you’re ready to add speed to your workout, how to find your goal pace, reasons for each workout as well as the first week of workouts to add to your training.

The Workouts

The Long Run: This week add one half mile to your run on one day of the week.

The Interval Workout: After your four lap warm up, run 800 meters at about your goal 5k pace (that’s two times around the track). Walk or jog for 200 meters. Repeat two more times. Finish with a cool down and a good stretch.

The Lactate Threshold Workout: This week we are doing this by time instead of mileage. Warm up for eight minutes. Run at a pace about 20 seconds slower than your goal 5k pace for five minutes. Jog for three minutes. Depending on your current mileage abilities, repeat once or twice more (don’t exceed the mileage of your “long run” day). Cool down for five more minutes and finish with a stretch.

Remember, in addition to these workout, you can run another one-three days during the week, nice easy, shorter runs (recovery runs). A sample schedule can be found in the last post.

Keep up the good work! See you next week.